Weight loss: Low fat diet plan could be better than low carb keto diet


The keto diet can help with weight loss, diabetes and epilepsy, according to Healthline. There’s also evidence to show that it may be beneficial for certain cancers and Alzheimer’s disease.

Many types of seafood are carb-free or very low in carbs, and fish such as salmon and mackerel are also high in omega-3 fats.

Non-starchy vegetables like cauliflower, broccoli, kale, spinach, zucchini, and tomatoes are other low-carb options, which can be used to mimic high-carb foods such as rice and spaghetti.

Meat, poultry, cheese, avocadoes and eggs are all other keto diet staples, as well as berries, dark chocolate, nuts and seeds.

Many celebrities have advocated a keto diet, using it to either lose weight or feel healthier.

Some of these include Kim Kardashian, Halle Berry, Vinny Guadagnino and LeBron James.

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However, a recent study by the National Institutes of Health, which was published by science journal ‘Nature Medicine’ on January 21, has shed new light on the keto diet.

Scientist Kevin Hall compared a keto diet to a low-fat, high carb diet and found some fascinating results.

Twenty volunteer participants were fed one of the diets for two weeks, before switching over to the other diet for another two weeks.

They were free to eat as much as they wanted from whichever diet they were on, and Mr Hall monitored their calorie intake, weight, body fat and insulin levels after meals.

On both diets, volunteers lost between one and two kilograms, on average.

But, interestingly, people on the low-fat diet lost body fat at a higher rate than people who followed the low-carb keto diet.

People on the low-fat diet also consumed less calories – a whopping 700 calories less than those on the keto diet, in fact.

However, the satiety effect (feeling of fullness) seemed to kick in at the beginning of the second week for those on the keto diet, as Mr Hall noticed that their consumption dropped by 300 calories every day.

This means that it may have dropped even more if the study had gone on for longer.

Participants on the low-carb diet also experienced less variability in blood sugar and insulin levels after meals.

“Interestingly, our findings suggest benefits to both diets, at least in the short-term,” Mr Hall said.

“While the low-fat, plant-based diet helps curb appetite, the animal-based, low-carb diet resulted in lower and more steady insulin and glucose levels.”





Source link Fit Fast Keto

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